The second Web Forum in our ‘Conversations with Luminaries’ series, Dialogue4Health is pleased to invite you to an intimate conversation between two leaders in the field of Population Health.

Jim Hester, PhD, has been active in health reform and population health for almost four decades.  Currently an independent consultant, he previously served as the Acting Director of the Population Health Models Group at the Innovation Center in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.  He is also a board member of the Public Health Institute.

Mary Pittman, DrPH, is the President and CEO of the Public Health Institute, only the second person to hold the job since PHI’s founding in 1964. She is a nationally recognized leader in improving community health and addressing health iniquities, and she is currently one of the leading forces behind PHI’s Population Health Innovation Lab (PHIL).

Please join us for a conversation where we gain insights, reflections, and wisdom about realistic models and visions for population health from two such notable experts. 

Presenters

Jim Hester, PhD

Former Director

Population Health Models Group

Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI)

James A. Hester, Ph.D. has been active in health reform and population health for almost four decades. His most recent position was the Acting Director of the Population Health Models Group at the Innovation Center in CMS assisting in the development of delivery system transformation and payment reform initiatives. Dr.…

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Moderator

Mary Pittman, DrPH

President and CEO

Public Health Institute

Oakland, CA

Mary A. Pittman, DrPH, is chief executive officer and president of the Public Health Institute (PHI) in Oakland, California. A nationally recognized leader in improving community health, addressing health inequities among vulnerable people and promoting quality of care, Pittman became in 2008 PHI’s second CEO and president since its founding…

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Presentation Slides

Resources